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HomemieventsProVision Conference Focus 2010

ProVision Conference Focus 2010

(Click here to view all the images from this event)

An impressive line up of industry leaders and celebrity speakers presented their views on business, life and the world of optometry at ProVision’s recent biennial national conference in Melbourne.

The theme for this year’s conference was Focus 2010 and the program didn’t disappoint. Delegates left with a full arsenal of ideas to improve their practices and personal lives.

ProVision’s CEO, Cam Battaglia said “The aim of the conference was to focus on key business and retail principles as well as personal leadership style and its impact on business and life success. We wanted to highlight that with the right strategies and mindset, there is a bright and sustainable future for independent optometry and our members.”

With the right strategies and mindset, there is a bright and sustainable future for independent optometry and our members

One of the new aspects of this year’s conference was a collection of rotating workshops, facilitated by expert presenters, covering leasing and shop-fitting, HR law, succession planning, how to grow a sustainable contact lens business and how not to infuriate your customers.

Celebrity speakers included Scott ‘The Doctor’ Williams who passionately believes that ‘laughter is the best medicine’, Australia’s most in-demand female presenter, Robyn Moore who has worked in education, advertising and the communication/entertainment Industry for over thirty years and the legendary John Anderson who told the story of how he started his beloved company, Contiki Tours with just 25 pounds in his pocket.

Bruno de Creton from Essilor delivered the only technical application of the conference. He was flown to the conference from Essilor’s head office in Paris to make his presentation in which he outlined the difference between Digital Surfacing and Traditional Surfacing in an in-depth lecture on advanced progressive lens design.

While the ProVision Panel, which comprised optometrists from around Australia provided discussion on techniques used to make their practice successful.

Business speaker and mivision columnist, John Lees spoke about raising the bar in the delivery of customer service. “The purpose of the business is to serve people and make sure their buying experience is as good as it can be. Treat patients as people,” he said.

“It’s not about charging more than anyone else; it’s avoiding the pressure to charge less. Those who charge less are trapped in the lower level of business.

“You don’t control transactions, the customer does… This is where you transcend and surpass the expectations and wants of customers. This is the area of need. This is the future for business and our job is to keep raising this bar. You’ll never get the job finished, it’s a lifelong journey.”

Corporate imposter Homer Papantonio posed as an Italian sports psychologist, invited to Melbourne to motivate the Collingwood team ahead of the AFL Grand Final, and spoke about peak performance, leadership, commitment, motivation and innovative thinking. Futurist Craig Rispin, back by popular demand, delivered his key message: “Know first, Be First and Profit First.”

The Gala Dinner was hosted by Scott Williams and retail business awards were given to eight practices based on a number of performance factors. The winners were Young Eyes Optometrists, NSW; My Optical Warwick, QLD; Noosa Optical, QLD; Eyre Eye Centre, SA; Richard Lindsay & Associates, VIC; Russo & Associates Optometry, VIC; Aaron Henry Optometrist, NSW; and Wodonga Eyecare, VIC.

At the dinner delegates donated a combined AUD$8,600 for ProVision’s charity of choice, Optometry Giving Sight.

ProVision’s Marketing Manager, Sarah O’Connor, said: “The conference equipped our members with practical advice and a game plan for obtaining some quick wins and long term benefits in their businesses.

“It is important in a marketplace that has become so challenging for independents – and in retail full stop – that people find, develop and maintain a point of difference.”