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Thursday / August 11.
HomeminewsNew Study Demonstrates Advantages of MultiColor Imaging

New Study Demonstrates Advantages of MultiColor Imaging

A research group from the Centre for Public Health at the Queen’s University in Belfast, Northern Ireland, has published the results of a study comparing Spectralis MultiColor imaging and traditional colour fundus photography for the detection of features of early and late age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The study’s findings demonstrate the benefits of Spectralis MultiColor imaging for increased sensitivity and specificity.

The study, published digitally in August and in the November issue of Retina, is titled: ‘Identifying features of early and late AMD: A comparison of MultiColor versus traditional colour fundus photography’. The authors are Katie W. Graham, Usha Chakravarthy, Ruth E. Hogg, K. Alyson Muldrew, Ian S. Young and Frank Kee, all of the Centre for Public Health, Queen’s University in Belfast, Northern Ireland.

The goal of the study was to compare the MultiColor Module of the Spectralis diagnostic imaging platform to colour fundus photography (CFP), which is currently considered the gold standard examination for the recognition and classification of features of early and late AMD. The Spectralis MultiColor Module is a newer imaging modality, which uses confocal scanning laser technology with light of discrete wavelengths instead of standard optics and white light to visualise the retina.

MultiColor was demonstrated to have higher sensitivity than CFP for the detection of early AMD features using a sample of 105 eyes. In cases with discrepancies, an analysis of OCT also showed better agreement with MultiColor for all AMD lesions, with the exception of haemorrhage and nongeographic atrophy hypopigmentation. For pigment clumping, CFP and MultiColor were in equal agreement to OCT. MultiColor imaging was able to identify soft drusen in 85 per cent, reticular drusen in 83 per cent, and atrophy and fibrosis in 100 per cent of cases where these abnormalities were seen on CFP.

It is encouraging to see the clinical significance of the MultiColor Module proven in a large study related to a prevalent pathology such as AMD

However, when using MultiColor as the basis for analysis, CFP was less sensitive. In this analysis, soft drusen were identified in only 58 per cent, reticular drusen in 28 per cent, atrophy in 83 per cent, and fibrosis in 68 per cent of the cases where such changes were seen on MultiColor images.

“This systematic analysis of colour fundus photography versus MultiColor demonstrated the robustness of MultiColor imaging in the detection of early AMD features. The ability to delineate atrophy and fibrosis in late stage AMD gives added value in the clinical setting, as these components of the wet AMD lesion have an important impact on visual function,” said Usha Chakravarthy, Professor of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences at Queen’s University.

“It is encouraging to see the clinical significance of the MultiColor Module proven in a large study related to a prevalent pathology such as AMD,” said Dr. Kester Nahen, Managing Director at Heidelberg Engineering.

“Beyond the clinical value, clinicians also appreciate the fact that MultiColor images can be acquired through undilated pupils and in patients with media opacity or even nystagmus. While we don’t see MultiColor as a substitute for colour fundus photography, which remains useful for documentation purposes, it is a particularly useful diagnostic tool that can be combined with other imaging modalities,” he said.

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