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HomeminewsAutism Seen in Baby’s Eyes

Autism Seen in Baby’s Eyes

An Australian researcher has discovered that measuring how a baby’s brain reacts to shifts in eye contact might help predict the development of autism symptoms from as young as six months.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column]

La Trobe University psychologist Dr. Kristelle Hudry, from the Olga Tennison Autism Research Centre on the Melbourne campus, is one of the key researchers in the international study released in late January
and published in the 26 January issue of the journal Current Biology.

“These results are important because early diagnosis can secure the best possible outcome for individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), through early access to intervention,” said Dr. Hudry.

“They also open up new avenues for scientists to carry out further research, to help us better understand the condition.”

They also open up new avenues for scientists to carry out further research, to help us better understand the condition

While behaviours characteristic of autism emerge over the first few years of life, a firm diagnosis using existing methods can usually only be made after the age of two.

In reality, Dr. Hudry says, diagnosis often doesn’t happen until much later, so most autism research has concentrated on children older than two years.

That means there is very little known about the very earliest symptoms and signs.

Dr. Hudry returned to Australia recently after five years in London, working in this area of research.