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Sunday / June 23.
HomemifashionnewsBest of Best Celebrated with ODMA Awards of Excellence

Best of Best Celebrated with ODMA Awards of Excellence

Members of the judging panel, L-R: Stefanos Stefanou, Keleigh Walsh, Professor Fiona Stapleton, and Richard Banks with Amanda Trotman (centre).

The Optical Distributors and Manufacturers Association (ODMA) has announced the 2023 Awards of Excellence across 13 categories, ranging from optical frames and sunglasses, children’s frames and sports eyewear, to lens design, lens coatings, optical equipment, over-the-counter products, accessories as well as point-of-sale and sustainability initiatives.

The 87 submissions were judged by a panel of experienced industry experts, comprising Richard Banks – independent optometrist; Keleigh Walsh – Head Teacher, Clinical Health, TAFE Digital; Fiona Stapleton, Scientia Professor, University of New South Wales; Stefanos Stefanou ‘fashion guru’ (www.stefinc.com); and Penny Prasad – Sustainability Expert, Director of The Ecoefficiency Group.

Amanda Trotman, Chief Executive Officer of ODMA, said the judging process facilitated “a nice exchange of ideas” with the volunteer judging panel agreeing unanimously on the winners. Submissions were judged on a variety of features, ranging from style, innovation and functionality to value for money.

The 2023 winners, announced at O=MEGA23 in Melbourne, are featured below.

Men’s Optical Frame

Face A Face Paris, Neonn

distributed by Eyes Right Optical

Crafted from titanium and beta titanium, this masculine frame is the result of a new colour application technique. A subtle tone-on-tone between the bar and the eye enriches the design and creates a luminous halo effect.

Finalists
MarcVincent, Olympic3, distributed by VS Eyewear.
Van Staveren, E007, distributed by VS Eyewear.

 

Optical Frame (non-specified gender)

The Elusive Miss Lou, The Sharp New Years Eve

distributed by The Elusive Miss Lou

This acetate frame is cast in fabric that was hand drawn by Miss Lou, who was “inspired by the joy and hope of a new year’s eve”. Created using Miss Lou’s unique lamination process.

Finalists
Nicola Finetti, NF961, distributed by Tiger Vision.
Avanti, Monet Ci, distributed by Modstyle.

 

Women’s Optical Frame

Kaleos, Faye

distributed by Sunglass Collective

This handmade cat eye design, made from acetate, features milling around the front with contrast tones for added dimension, and built-in acetate nose pads.

Finalists

Face A Face Paris, Memfis, distributed by Eyes Right Optical.
MarcVincent, Horizons in Fuscia, distributed by VS Eyewear.

 

Sunglass – jointly won by:

Cutler and Gross(left)
CGSN-9797-52-03 CATEYE

distributed by Noo Eyewear

 

Carrera, Flaglab (right)
Style 11

distributed by Safilo

Cutler and Gross’ 90s inspired sunglass features sculpted frontals with weight-saving milling and modern flourishes. It has a 6-base wrap around the lens. Crafted from robust yet lightweight aluminium, Carrera’s Flaglab features the iconic flaglab shape with a central ‘C’ and flag stripe; true expressions of the bold Carrera style.

Finalists

Robert Cavalli, Special Edition 2023, distributed by De Rigo.
Cove, Byron C3, distributed by VS Eyewear.
Caroline Abram, Kelia 267, distributed by Frames Etcetera.

 

Children’s Frame

Planet Pop, Minke

distributed by Little4Eyes

Planet Pop’s Minke frame is named after the Minke whale. This sustainable collection is made from BPA-free, plant based renewable bio-materials.

Finalists

Dilli Dalli, Cake Pop, distributed by Little4Eyes.
Barbie, BAAA09c70, distributed by Little4E.

 

Sports Eyewear

Oakley, Kato 90SE

distributed by EssilorLuxottica

Oakley’s Kato sports frame is engineered to push the boundaries of performance with a purpose-built design that conforms to the contours of the face for a seamless look. This progressive, disruptive wrap design with frameless architecture has an innovative tilt function.

Finalist

Nike Flyfree, distributed by Marchon.

 

Lens Design

Hoya MiyoSmart

distributed by HOYA

MiyoSmart by Hoya is the world’s first spectacle lens with Defocus Incorporated Multiple Segments (DIMS) technology that manages myopia progression.

Finalists

Bolle Volt+, distributed by
Sunglass Collective.
Varilux XR Series by EssilorLuxottica.

 

Lens Coating

HiVision Meiryo Diamond

by Hoya

Hoya says its “best ever” antireflective coating delivers the “best possible” vision. Compared to major competitors, Hoya states that Meiryo Diamond
provides 56% lower reflectance, up to 2.5x better scratch resistance, lasts up to five times longer, and provides 100% UV protection

Finalists

Crizal Sapphire by Essilor Luxottica.
Transitions XTRActive Polarised by EssilorLuxottica.

 

Optical Equipment and Instruments

VF2000 NEO

by Micro Medical Devices, distributed by BOC

Built on cutting-edge software, the VF2000 Neo broadens clinical scope beyond simply offering the most reliable visual field (VF) testing, without compromising accuracy of results. visual field protocols and a variety of added self-guided vision tests in rich, full-colour 4K-resolution.

Finalists

Topcon Solos, distributed by Device Technologies.
Haag Streit Lenstar Myopia, distributed by Device Technologies.
iCare Eidon UWF, distributed by Designs for Vision.
Cylite HP-OCT by Cylite.

 

Accessories

Eyes Are The Story

distributed by Good Optical Services

Eyes Are The Story is the first optocosmetics and skincare specifically formulated and clinically proven safe for sensitive eyes and skin, contact lens wearers, people suffering from dry eye disease and /or digital strain, rosacea and Sjögen’s. Products are rigorously tested by dermatologists and ophthalmologists, and audited by the Mayo Clinic’s skin safe platform.

Finalist

COTI eyewear chains by Optica Life Accessories.

 

Product Environment (POS/Retail)

CNXT Professional

by Rodenstock

CNXT Professional, comprising CNXT Smart and CNXT Select, provides an engaging visual
consulting tool for all relevant customer decisions that need to be made in the dispensing
process, such as progression zone designs, glass materials and colours, and coatings.

Finalist

WOOW Flying High, distributed by Eyes Right Optical.

 

Sustainability – jointly won by:

Zeiss Packaging (left)

Project Green Eyewear (right)

by Eyes Right Optical

Zeiss has proactively changed all of its key packaging cartons to 100% recycled material printed with environmentally friendly soybased inks. Frame-to-follow bags have been changed to a compostable material.

 

 

Project Green creates high-end, environmentally-friendly eyewear that doesn’t compromise on quality, style, look, or feel. Made from Mazzucchelli
biodegradable acetates, frames are fitted with biodegradable demo lenses and presented in reconstituted leather cases and biodegradable packaging. This year, one tree has been planted for every frame purchased, via the One Tree Planted program.

Finalist

Plastic neutrality initiative by CooperVision.

 

Over the Counter Products

Blephadex Pro

distributed by Optimed

Blephadex Pro for the treatment of dry eye, has a unique patented combination of tea tree oil, medical grade Manuka honey, coconut oil, and gentle lid cleanser.

 

Impressive Innovation

Professor Fiona Stapleton from the University of New South Wales School of Vision Science, said the judging panel looked at several criteria including style, wearability, innovation, quality and value when reviewing frame submissions.

“We considered the ease of fitting a lens and adjusting the frame, how well it would sit and stay on a person’s face, and the finish,” she explained.

She described the winning Carrera Flaglab frame as “on trend in terms of shape, and beautifully made… with nicely sprung sides; a beautifully finished frame”.

Noting the wearability of Cutler and Gross’ winning frame, she said, “We all loved the Cutler and Gross frame – it looks good on everyone, it has metal that runs all the way down through the temples for easy adjustment, and despite looking heavy, is comfortable and light on the face”.

Richard Banks observed the “space-age” design of Oakley’s Kato 90SE. “The way the shield and bridge piece has been moulded, the top bar that cuts glare, and the colour – aesthetically, it looks great and it feels like a quality piece of eyewear,” he said.

Tech Making a Difference

Mr Banks was also impressed with submissions to the equipment category, noting new devices he hadn’t been aware of that can potentially make a real difference to the eye care services delivered by independent optometrists.

“There was a lot of virtual reality and equipment that integrates multiple measurements or tasks in one instrument; all of which results in better service for the patient. Custom solutions give us more time to spend with the patient, make our work better and more enjoyable,” he said.

“When you talk to patients about how a new piece of equipment performs a task better, even if it’s not particularly high-tech, they really respond well to it,” he added.

Ms Trotman observed that multiple submissions to the new sustainable awards category were received, ranging from frames through to packaging.

Speaking of the winning sustainable submissions, Penny Prasad noted that along with producing an environmentally friendly eyewear range, award winner Eyes Right Optical had implemented significant initiatives at its manufacturing plant, including installing solar, LED, electric vehicles, a veggie patch, recycling, and compostable packaging.

Through its efforts, co-winner Zeiss achieved carbon neutral energy in 2022, and is actively promoting its target to be carbon neutral by 2025.

Opening Doors

After a few tough years for the industry, Ms Trotman said she was thrilled that ODMA could support suppliers by showcasing and celebrating innovation.

“There is so much competition and corporatisation in the market, so the Awards are a chance for Australian distributors to show what’s new, what’s great, and to celebrate what the industry is achieving,” she said.

Judge Keleigh Walsh said the awards also provide an opportunity for eye care practitioners to be exposed to quality products and services “out there that may not be knocking on their doors”.