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Thursday / August 18.
HomeminewsPlaying Outside for Your Eyes

Playing Outside for Your Eyes

New university research aims to shed light on why being outside can help children see better.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column]

The research is being led by Dr. Scott Read from Queensland University of Technology (QUT)’s School of Optometry.

“The exact cause of nearsightedness, or myopia, is not clear,” Dr. Read said.

“However, a number of recent studies have identified an association between higher levels of outdoor activities and a reduced chance of developing nearsightedness. Our study will be looking at why this association exists.”

…a number of recent studies have identified an association between higher levels of outdoor activities and a reduced chance of developing nearsightedness..

Researchers will periodically measure the length of participants’ eyes and structures within the eye, such as the retina and choroid, believed to be important in myopia development. Children’s levels of physical activity, as well as their exposure to light will also be measured.

His team will consider whether participation in physical activities is the relevant factor, more so than the fact a person is outdoors and whether light exposure might be the reason for reduced incidence of nearsightedness.

The research project has received AUD$375,000 of funding from the Australian Research Council and will take place over three years.

The research team is looking for short sighted and non-short sighted children aged between 11 and 14 years of age to participate in this research.

For more information email: sa.read@qut.edu.au

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